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Strebler's Perspective

July, 2017 Archives

Sector Switches

by Jon S. Strebler

 

One hallmark of an extended bull market is shifting among different market sectors, as one group after another takes on a leadership role, then fades as other sectors gain in strength. With new all-time highs in most all stock market indexes, and finally in our own PTI (below) let’s look at a few areas of interest that are hot or maybe not.

 

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Bull Speed Ahead?

by Jon S. Strebler

 

Last week we pondered the possibility of the stock market stumbling, a correction ahead based on chart action of the S&P 500. Right at the critical point, right on cue, stocks rallied and once again put the idea of a market correction on the back shelf. New highs in the S&P 500. New highs in the Dow Jones Industrials and the Transports. The NASDAQ regaining the lead and within striking distance of its all-time highs. The Advance/Decline line – still on a merciless tear, recording new highs day after day, week after week. And finally, the missing link: New all-time highs on our Primary Trend Indicator (PTI) after months of sideways action.

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Time to Buy Gold?

by Jon S. Strebler

 

The Sunday edition of the local newspaper included an article on that topic by financial writer Terry Savage.  Her short answer was: Maybe not, but here’s some tips if you decide to go ahead.  It wasn’t a particularly illuminating piece, yet with gold’s recent declines the prompt itself is a good one.  Let’s try to answer her question. 

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Bonds Warning?

By Jon S. Strebler

 

Historically, bonds and stocks move in opposite directions as the macroeconomic picture changes over time. Generally, this is because as the economy slows down, people sell their stocks and place money in bonds, which are usually safer investments. Stocks go down, bond prices go up. The flip side is when things are looking up for an economy; people sell their safer bonds and go into stocks, where their profit potential is greater. In that scenario, bonds go down and stocks rise in price.

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